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Welcome to the UK Clinical Trials Gateway

Thank you for visiting the UK Clinical Trials Gateway. We hope it gives you a clear understanding of what is involved if you participate in a clinical trial. You can search this site in various ways to find trials relevant to you and contact researchers yourself.

But, before doing any of this, you may have questions about trials, what they are and how they work. Indeed, you may have come to this site because your doctor has invited you to join a trial but you want to know more before you decide.

Taking part in medical research is a big step. It can potentially deliver great benefits to you or a loved one but it may also involve some inconvenience or risk. This site includes plenty of information about what a trial involves and what you can expect if you take part (more here).

We hope the general information about trials is useful. You may find that individual trial records contain complex scientific and medical terms and are hard to understand. We are working to address this (more here) and hope that you are able to find out what you need from the contact named on the trial record or from your own doctor.

We continue to introduce and test new features on the site and welcome your feedback and comments.If you have any general questions about the UKCTG website or suggestions about how we can improve it, please feel free to contact us at ukctg@nihr.ac.uk.


Find trials near you.


Click on a location to see the trials running.


Latest research findings


from the NIHR Dissemination Centre

Uncertain benefit of adding amisulpiride to clozapine for treatment-resistant schizophrenia
For adults with schizophrenia who continue to have symptoms despite treatment with the antipsychotic drug clozapine, adding amisulpride (another antipsychotic) was not shown to improve their chance of responding. It is not yet clear whether a larger trial would show an effect, as too few people were recruited to the NIHR-funded trial to be sure. Participants were more likely to experience side effects and the trial does provide some important information for future studies in this difficult treatment area. The current NICE guidance recommends adding a second antipsychotic to clozapine for patients in these circumstances but does not specify any particular drug. Amisulpride is often used in practice, but to date, there had not been much evidence on which to base this decision. Only 68 people with this severe form of schizophrenia were recruited instead of the expected 230, so the ability to detect any clinically significant differences between the groups is reduced.
14 November 2017

A commonly used treatment does not improve chronic low back pain
This trial found that destroying nerves that take pain signals to the brain using heat (radiofrequency denervation) did not improve pain, function or a sense of “recovery”. The treatment was used alongside exercise and was a variation of the technique commonly used in the UK. In this large study, it was compared to exercise alone. Low back pain is usually short-lived, but some people develop long-term back pain which can negatively impact their lives. NICE recommends exercise, pain relief and self-management to cope with pain. If these treatments are not effective and pain is severe, then more intensive options, such as radiofrequency denervation can be considered. These findings suggest that this technique of radiofrequency denervation does not provide a significant advantage in addition to exercise. This trial used different denervation techniques that are used in the UK, and the participants were still improving with exercise therapy. Radiofrequency denervation is only used in the UK when exercise is no longer effective. Therefore, the findings may not be directly applicable to practice in this country, but certainly, raise doubt regarding its use.
07 November 2017

Breathing exercises improve asthma and can be learned by DVD
Breathing exercises taught by a physiotherapist in person or on DVD both improved the quality of life of adults with poorly controlled asthma to a small but similar extent. The DVD was the cheapest option, and it could lead to inexpensive internet delivery in the future. This NIHR-funded trial recruited 655 UK adults with poorly controlled asthma. It showed about 63% of those receiving the breathing exercises had clinically important improvements in their asthma-related quality of life over a year, compared to 56% who improved receiving usual care. Exercises did not improve formally measured lung function, suggesting the underlying biology of the asthma was unchanged. The findings imply that breathing exercise programmes – currently recommended in the 2016 British guideline on the management of asthma when delivered by a physiotherapist – may be equally effective, and cheaper when delivered via DVD (or another video).
07 November 2017

More research news on clinical trials

Better healthcare starts with you

The UK Clinical Trials Gateway is designed to help you participate in clinical trials running in the UK.

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