Better healthcare starts with you
what is UKCTG?
Try searching for a clinical trial   You can search by condition or relevant keywords
in

Welcome to the UK Clinical Trials Gateway

Thank you for visiting the UK Clinical Trials Gateway. We hope it gives you a clear understanding of what is involved if you participate in a clinical trial. If you decide to sign up so that researchers can contact you about trials that might be suitable, you can do so here. You can also search this site in various ways to find trials relevant to you and contact researchers yourself.

But, before doing any of this, you may have questions about trials, what they are and how they work. Indeed, you may have come to this site because your doctor has invited you to join a trial but you want to know more before you decide.

Taking part in medical research is a big step. It can potentially deliver great benefits to you or a loved one but it may also involve some inconvenience or risk. This site includes plenty of information about what a trial involves and what you can expect if you take part (more here).

We hope the general information about trials is useful. You may find that individual trial records contain complex scientific and medical terms and are hard to understand. We are working to address this (more here) and hope that you are able to find out what you need from the contact named on the trial record or from your own doctor.

We continue to introduce and test new features on the site and welcome your feedback and comments.If you have any general questions about the UKCTG website or suggestions about how we can improve it, please feel free to contact us at ukctg@nihr.ac.uk.


Find trials near you.


Click on a location to see the trials running.


Latest research findings


from the NIHR Dissemination Centre

Induction of labour within 24 hours, if waters break at 37 weeks of pregnancy, can reduce womb infection
Inducing labour may halve the risk of infection in the womb when waters break from 37 weeks. The procedure was started within 24 hours and was compared to waiting for labour to start on its own. Waters breaking at full term without the onset of labour is called pre-labour rupture of membranes. This can increase risks of maternal and neonatal infection and the need for caesarean section. As most women deliver spontaneously within a day, NICE recommend that women are offered an informed choice of either induction 24 hours after premature rupture of membranes or to watch and wait. This updated Cochrane review included new evidence and suggests that induction before 24 hours may reduce infections without increasing caesarean sections, but there remains some uncertainty. This is due to low study quality, lack of longer term outcomes, and too few participants in trials to compare the numbers of any rare serious events. These findings may help inform shared decisions about induction by providing more information to help women understand the risks.
23 May 2017

Very strict blood sugar control in critically ill children provides no benefit
Strict control of blood sugar levels for critically ill children in ICU with high blood sugar did not increase the number of days they spent outside of ICU in the first month. The trial was stopped early as more infections and very low glucose levels were recorded in the strict control group. This trial found that using insulin to control blood sugar to within 4.4 to 6.1 mmol/L, rather than 8.3 to 10mmol/L, in critically ill children made no difference to the number of days they spent in the intensive care unit. This trial indicates that maintaining blood sugar control within tight boundaries in this group is of no benefit and may be harmful. It is time to review the target blood sugar levels for critically ill children with high blood sugar.
23 May 2017

A blood test threshold for diagnosing heart failure in general practice is reviewed
The cut-off level for the blood test NTproBNP appears to provide the best balance of detecting true cases while excluding false positives when lowered to 125 pg/ml. The trial supported by the NIHR included a sample of people presenting to their GP with suspected heart failure. It aimed to see which method was best for identifying those who needed referral: the blood test alone; clinical decision rules based on clinical symptoms; or the combination of both. The blood test alone at the 125 pg/ml cut-off correctly identified 94% of people with heart failure but led to 50% of peoplewho did not have heart failurebeing referred for further investigation. This threshold is lower than the level currently recommended by NICE (≥400 pg/ml), which could miss up to one in five people. Clinical decision rules used alone or in combination with the blood test did not improve detection rates. However, the lower cut-off would also mean that one in two people without heart failure would be referred for unnecessary expensive tests. A cost-effectiveness analysis is being prepared, which will enable decision-makers to balance the effectiveness of the different approaches.
03 May 2017

More research news on clinical trials

Better healthcare starts with you

The UK Clinical Trials Gateway is designed to help you participate in clinical trials running in the UK.

Read more