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Welcome to the UK Clinical Trials Gateway

Thank you for visiting the UK Clinical Trials Gateway. We hope it gives you a clear understanding of what is involved if you participate in a clinical trial. You can search this site in various ways to find trials relevant to you and contact researchers yourself.

But, before doing any of this, you may have questions about trials, what they are and how they work. Indeed, you may have come to this site because your doctor has invited you to join a trial but you want to know more before you decide.

Taking part in medical research is a big step. It can potentially deliver great benefits to you or a loved one but it may also involve some inconvenience or risk. This site includes plenty of information about what a trial involves and what you can expect if you take part (more here).

We hope the general information about trials is useful. You may find that individual trial records contain complex scientific and medical terms and are hard to understand. We are working to address this (more here) and hope that you are able to find out what you need from the contact named on the trial record or from your own doctor.

We continue to introduce and test new features on the site and welcome your feedback and comments.If you have any general questions about the UKCTG website or suggestions about how we can improve it, please feel free to contact us at ukctg@nihr.ac.uk.


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Click on a location to see the trials running.


Latest research findings


from the NIHR Dissemination Centre

Additional therapy helps social recovery from first episode psychosis
Social recovery therapy increases structured activity, such as work, education or sport, by eight hours per week for people with severe social withdrawal following a first episode of psychosis. This cognitive behavioural type of treatment was added to other early interventions and might be particularly useful for those lacking motivation or living with other conditions that prevent them engaging with mental health services. This NIHR-funded trial included 154 young adults with first episode of psychosis under the care of early intervention services in England. These are specialist multidisciplinary mental health services which aim to help people make a full mental, physical and social recovery. The participants had been under their care for at least a year and had extreme social withdrawal, which often limits their capacity to engage in therapy. Social recovery therapy not only increases structured activity levels but also appears to keep people in contact with services in the critical first nine months. It could be incorporated into early intervention services for people with persistent social withdrawal.
20 February 2018

Calcium channel blockers are useful in managing Raynaud’s phenomenon
Calcium channel blockers, such as nifedipine, are confirmed as useful in reducing the frequency, duration, severity of attacks, pain and disability associated with Raynaud’s phenomenon. People had two to six fewer attacks per week on average with treatment, and 13 without. Raynaud’s is a disorder which reduces blood flow to the fingers and toes as a result of the blood vessels tightening and going into spasm in the cold. This updated review suggested that calcium channel blockers may be more effective in higher doses than lower doses and help primary symptoms rather than the secondary form of Raynaud’s that is due to underlying disease. Most research has been into nifedipine. Although no serious adverse events while using calcium channel blockers were reported, more people withdrew from trials as a result of minor side effects. Previous studies have also shown that calcium channel blockers were effective, but this review expands the research for this indication and might inform future guidelines.
20 February 2018

Gout medication may slow progression of chronic kidney disease
In people with existing kidney disease, one in four will have worse disease within six to 12 months. Uric acid-lowering drugs such as allopurinol halve the risk of disease progression over this period. They also reduce heart attack or stroke by 60%. Uric acid, the cause of gout, is produced when proteins are broken down by the body. It is excreted by the kidneys and often builds up in people with chronic kidney disease. It is not certain whether increased uric acid causes progression of kidney disease or is simply a marker of its severity. This review included 16 small trials of 1,211 people with moderate chronic kidney disease from a variety of causes which were allocated to take a uric acid lowering medication or usual care. Although these results are promising, they are based on low-quality trials. The low rate of side effects should be taken into account when considering these drugs as an option to slow the progression of kidney failure and prevent heart disease.
20 February 2018

More research news on clinical trials

Better healthcare starts with you

The UK Clinical Trials Gateway is designed to help you participate in clinical trials running in the UK.

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